Gov. Inslee Visits Yelm, Lauds Early Learning

By Jenna Loughlin jloughlin@yelmonline.com
Posted 2/5/15

With Gov. Jay Inslee's proposed budget for Washington recommending investments in the state's education system, he took the opportunity to visit two successful programs within the Yelm Community …

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Gov. Inslee Visits Yelm, Lauds Early Learning

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With Gov. Jay Inslee's proposed budget for Washington recommending investments in the state's education system, he took the opportunity to visit two successful programs within the Yelm Community Schools district to see why those involved believe they are important and what kinds of support and resources they need in order to improve.

Inslee began his visit to Yelm at the high school's career and technical education, or CTE, area. He heard from students learning about solar panels, auto mechanics and human kinetics.

In a roundtable discussion that included student leaders from CTE related organizations, Inslee emphasized how lucky Yelm High School students are to have so many choices when it comes to CTE programing. His theory that students involved in these programs and classes not only gain technical advantages, but also additional motivation in other classes was proven valid when students shared stories of how CTE classes have allowed them to be excited to come to school, realize the applications of information they are learning in other classes and find their passion.

At Fort Stevens, the governor read a book he authored to a classroom of young students, engaging them and asking them questions about what they had just heard.



In the round table discussion, Inslee was interested to hear from participants ways to better engage the community around early learning and what kinds of support and resources they need in order to improve. Law enforcement representatives stressed the reason they see early learning as an important investment is because keeping kids in school now prevents crime in the future. Those who interact with the students said it was important to bring these services to all students in the state and to create a uniform system in regards to merging higher-need students with their typically-developing peers. The need for classroom space and structural components like properly-sized playgrounds was also mentioned.

At the end of both roundtables, Inslee asked those in attendance to speak to their legislators about how important these programs are to the educational continuum and urge them to help find the funding to make them available to children statewide.

For a more in-depth article, check out the Friday, Feb. 13 edition of the Nisqually Valley News.

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