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“One of the biggest challenges of the 21st Century is dealing with the progress of the 20th Century — especially old computers, monitors, cellular phones and televisions. These appliances depend on potentially hazardous materials, such as mercury, to operate.  After a five-to-eight year usef…

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Imagine sitting home and learning Fortune Magazine just listed you among the world’s greatest leaders? That’s exactly what happened to Marilyn Bartlett, who led the effort to save Montana’s state employee health insurance plan from bankruptcy.

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Across the American West, public forestlands, especially federal lands, are a deep shade of red as dead trees crowd forests that have been poorly managed. When I worked at the Washington State Department of Natural Resources 15 years ago, environmental groups opposed thinning that would have…

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People across our planet are increasingly aware of the growing amounts of trash floating in our oceans. While we are finding new ways to collect it, the more vexing problem is what to do with it.

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I’m really proud of the telemedicine bills I’ve managed to get passed by the Legislature this year, and I look forward to attending the bill signings that will make the bills law. However, I’m also disappointed in some missed opportunities for health-care reform that really would have made a…

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Our district’s strategic plan goals #3 and #5 state that students will learn in modern classrooms equipped with the tools necessary to achieve at exemplary levels, and that we will successfully manage the current and future growth of our district. The events of the past two months show we ar…

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Before lawmakers wrap-up their work in Olympia, they should re-examine their hefty new state spending plan. The budget may not be sustainable even with a substantial increase in taxes. It may force legislators to return to the State Capitol to cut workers, programs and services; or, even hik…

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The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) plans to strategically release an additional 50 million chinook from its hatcheries this year to benefit starving southern resident orcas.

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Each year, Americans throw away more than three billion batteries, constituting 180,000 tons of hazardous material and the situation is likely to get much worse as the world shifts to electric vehicles.

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